Adults often tell children that “you’re lucky to have a roof over your head”— and they’re right. More than just a shield from the elements, a beautiful roof can serve literally as the crowning glory of your house. With so many options available, it can be hard to choose the right one.

The right “crown” for your house can be anything from classic to contemporary, Old World European to Classic American, or early Colonial structures to modern trends. And these are just a few of the possibilities.
Here’s a look at some of the most beloved roof styles:

The Gable

The gable roof — that classic triangle shape — is by far one of the most popular roof styles anywhere in the world. Americans, in particular, love this design because it’s easy to maintain and looks elegant with almost any home floor plan. The gable offers good ventilation and adequate ceiling space, which helps lessen the burden on most HVAC systems. This design also drains water effectively because of its steep triangle shape.

The Hip

A basic hip, or hipped roof, is a sturdy design wherein the roof gradually slopes down on all four sides, creating a steep pitch. This typically features two longer sides and two shorter sides, resembling a rectangle-like shape. These types have a consistent level fascia, which means you can fit the gutters all around. These also have dormer slanted sides. Although this offers less roof space compared to the gable, hip roofs can withstand extreme winds better than other designs because it has fewer sharp corners, shallower slopes, and fundamentally more stable structure.

The Saltbox

Saltbox roofs are an attractive asymmetrical design featuring a long, pitched roof that slopes down to the back of the building. This style is often used in homes with two stories on one side and a single story on the other. It takes its name from its resemblance to a wooden lidded box where salt was kept back in the old days.

The Mansard

Inspired by classic French architecture, a mansard roof is a variation of a hipped roof that features two different angles/slopes. The lower slope is usually steeper and more vertical than the upper slope. This design makes maximum use of the interior space of the attic and gives you a simpler way to add stories to your home without necessarily requiring any masonry work.

The Gambrel

The gambrel roof design is a Dutch-inspired style similar to the gable, but with the addition of an angle in the lines of the triangle. This classic design is most often seen in barns, which is why it’s also known as a “barn roof.”

A house is never a home without a roof. Call us now and we’ll be glad to help you with any of your roofing needs. Whether you need repairs, advice, or installation, when it comes to roofing, we nail it.